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How to Cook a Beef Roast

How to Cook a Beef Roast

Deciding on what roast beef to choose, as well as preparing then cooking the perfect beef roast can sometimes be an intimidating prospect for both new and seasoned chefs alike. From choosing the perfect type of beef roast for the occasion, texture, flavour, and number of people, to making sure that the temperature of your oven is correct, some people do find the thought of it all a little overwhelming!

However, this guide will take you through all of our roasting joints for roast beef options, with introductions guiding you through each of our roast beef products, and instructions on how to cook every type of roast beef.
So whether you have never made a roast beef before, or want to try a different type of roast beef than your usual, this guide will tell you everything you need to know about how to cook a roast beef.
So, from how to choose a beef roast, to how to season a beef roast, to how to cook a beef roast, read on to find out more about every type of beef roasting joint.
Many of our roast beef options are made from Scotch Beef, which has protected geographic status and means that the animal was born, raised, and processed right here in Scotland while adhering to the highest standards of animal welfare and sustainable farming practices.

 

Before you Roast Your Beef

Before you roast your beef it is really important that you allow the roasting joint to reach room temperature. This is because if the middle of your roast is on the cool side it may take longer for the centre to cook and reach the ideal temperature for consumption. This in turn means that you may end of with a roast that is overcooked on the outside while being undercooked on the inside. In order to achieve this, simply take your beef roasting joint out of the fridge for a while before cooking and allow for the centre of the beef roasting joint to reach room temperature. You will need to cover the roasting joint with a bit of cling film to prevent oxidisation of the meat which is when the meat starts to turn a slightly unappealing colour and begin to spoil. So place the joint in a roasting tin and loosely cover with cling film or a tea towel. If using a tea towel make sure to wash this after use to prevent cross-contamination of raw meat and other areas of your kitchen. This should be done at least 30 minutes before placing the roast in the oven, but for very large roast beef joints this may take closer to two hours. You can preheat your oven during this stage4, and make sure to arrange your shelves so that the roast will sit in the centre of the oven while cooking.

 

How to Season a Beef Roast

There are plenty of ways to season your roast beef, and a lot of options depending on your personal tastes and preferred flavours. One of the simplest and most popular ways of seasoning a roast beef joint is to just use a generous amount of salt and pepper. This way you bring out the natural flavours of the roast beef without overpowering it. One easy and time-saving way you can do this is to season your beef roast then allow it to come to room temperature before putting in the oven.

 

While you Roast your Beef

While you roast your beef you will find that juices start to gather in your tin or roasting tray. These can be used to make the base for an excellent accompanying gravy, or you can also choose to baste your meat. Basting your meat essentially allows for some of the moisture lost during the cooking process to be added back into the roast, which improves both the texture of the roast to be juicier and also allows the flavours of the roast to have a greater depth. This process involves taking your meat out of the oven and using a baster, spoon, or ladle to pick up some of the juices that are gathering in the roasting tray and pouring them back on top of the meat. You will want to do this 2 or 3 times during the roasting process at regular intervals. Remember to keep your oven door closed while you are basting your roast beef so that you do not lose any heat.

 

After you Roast your Beef

Before serving your roast beef, there is one last crucial stage of the process, and that is to allow your meat to rest before carving. This allows for some of the juices lost during cooking to further absorb which stops your beef roast from drying out, and also adds a bit more flavour to your roast. This process also means that the roast will be easier to carve. When you take out your roast place it on a clean and warm plate, or a chopping board, and cover with foil so that the roast does not lose too much heat then allow to rest. This will take 10 minutes for a small roasting joint, or up to 30 minutes for a large beef roast.

 

Types of Roast Beef and Cooking Times

 

Picanha Joint

This South American style cut is growing in popularity, and is perfect for cooking then slicing into delicious beef strips which are excellent in tacos or burritos.

Cooking Method

Temperature: 180C/160C for a fan oven/Gas Mark 4
Time: 30 minutes per 500g, then another 30 minutes

 

Scotch Beef Whole Fillet

The whole fillet is a premium cut of meat that is sure to impress any guests. It is prized for being the most tender cut of beef.

Cooking Method

Temperature: 180C/160C for a fan oven/Gas Mark 4
Time: 30 minutes per 500g, then another 30 minutes

 

Scotch Beef Carvery Rib of Beef

This cut is taken from the rib, and is a show stopping cut that is packed with flavour.

Cooking Method

Temperature: 180C/160C for a fan oven/Gas Mark 4
Time: 25 minutes per 500g, then another 25 minutes

 

Scotch Beef Whole Rump

The rump cut is cut from the back of the animal, known for being a particularly tasty cut while being very good value.

Cooking Method

Temperature: 180C/160C for a fan oven/Gas Mark 4
Time: 30 minutes per 500g, then another 30 minutes

 

Scotch Beef Topside

Topside is cut from the leg, and is extremely lean and tender.

Cooking Method

Temperature: 180C/160C for a fan oven/Gas Mark 4
Time: 30 minutes per 500g, then another 30 minutes

 

Scotch Beef Striploin

This cut is perfect as a roast option, and can also be cut into steaks.

Cooking Method

Temperature: 180C/160C for a fan oven/Gas Mark 4
Time: 30 minutes per 500g, then another 30 minutes

 

Scotch Beef Sirloin Roasting Joint

Sirloin is close to the fillet in terms of texture, but also has a deeper flavour and is excellent value.

Cooking Method

Temperature: 180C/160C for a fan oven/Gas Mark 4
Time: 30 minutes per 500g, then another 30 minutes

 

Scotch Beef Silverside

Coming from the hind-quarter, silverside is a lean cut with a layer of fat that adds flavour.

Cooking Method

Temperature: 180C/160C for a fan oven/Gas Mark 4
Time: 30 minutes per 500g, then another 30 minutes

 

Scotch Beef Rib of Beef Boneless

This is a large joint of meat with a deep flavour and strong marbling. The bone is removed and the joint is rolled and tied for easy carving.

Cooking Method

Temperature: 180C/160C for a fan oven/Gas Mark 4
Time: 30 minutes per 500g, then another 30 minutes

 

Scotch Beef Rib Eye Roasting Joint

The stronger marbling of Rib Eye makes this roasting joint one of the most succulent available while also being extremely full of flavour.

Cooking Method

Temperature: 180C/160C for a fan oven/Gas Mark 4
Time: 30 minutes per 500g, then another 30 minutes

 

Scotch Beef Chateaubriand

Chateaubriand is a premium roasting option that is perfect for entertaining.

Cooking Method

Temperature: 180C/160C for a fan oven/Gas Mark 4
Time: 30 minutes per 500g, then another 30 minutes

 

Beef Brisket Roasting Joint

Brisket is cut from the chest of the animal, and is packed with flavour.

Cooking Method

Temperature: 180C/160C for a fan oven/Gas Mark 4
Time: 30 minutes per 500g, then another 30 minutes